WingHaven Pediatrics agrees with the most recent post from the American Academy of Pediatrics regarding vaccines.

Claims that vaccines are linked to autism, or are unsafe when administered according to the recommended schedule, have been disproven by a robust body of medical literature. It is dangerous to public health to suggest otherwise. 

 “There is no ‘alternative’ immunization schedule. Delaying vaccines only leaves a chil​d at risk of disease for a longer period of time.

WingHaven Pediatrics perspective on vaccinations

The physicians of WingHaven Pediatrics strongly believe in following the vaccine schedule of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).   We believe that timely vaccinations are the key to preventing dangerous and life–threatening childhood diseases.   As these illnesses begin to resurface throughout the United States and Missouri, we strongly recommend vaccinating your child on time and in accordance with the AAP guidelines. Please feel assured that we will continue to incorporate reputable scientific information in our medical practices. Your child's health is our top priority—if you have any concerns regarding vaccinations, we will be happy to discuss these with you.


Vaccinations—the Myths

Myth: Vaccinations Cause SIDS—FALSE

Vaccinations have been accused of causing a variety of childhood illnesses including autism and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Less than 20 years ago, the DPT vaccine (Diphtheria, Pertussis and Tetanus) was accused of causing SIDS. Since then, numerous studies have shown no correlation between the DPT vaccine and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In addition, in 2003, the Institute of Medicine released a report confirming that there was no relationship between multiple vaccinations and SIDS. In fact, when researchers probed into other possible causes of SIDS, it was determined that proper sleep positioning was the major culprit. Since the Back to Sleep campaign began in 1992, the SIDS rate has declined by 40%.


Myth: Vaccinations Cause Autism—FALSE

In 1998, a small study of 12 autistic children suggested that there was a link between autism and the MMR vaccine.  They blamed Thimerosal a mercury containing preservative found in the vaccine. As a precaution, the CDC and the AAP recommended that thimerosal be eliminated from all vaccines, and since 2001, no childhood vaccination has contained this preservative. Yet, even with these precautions, the rate of autism has not declined.

Numerous studies since 1998 continue to show no link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

In 2002, a large Danish study, conclusively put to rest any doubt that the MMR vaccination and autism were linked. Researchers followed 537,000 children and found no difference in the rates of autism between children who were vaccinated and those who were not.


Vaccinations—the Truth

Vaccinations have saved the lives of millions of children around the world. Unfortunately, as the myths surrounding vaccinations continue to resurface, more and more parents are choosing to delay or even not to vaccinate their children. As a result, we are beginning to see a resurgence of these illnesses in the United States for the first time in over 50 years. If vaccinations were stopped, there would be 2.7 million deaths worldwide EVERY YEAR from just measles alone. Children who are not vaccinated or who delay their vaccinations have a much greater chance of contracting these serious illnesses. In addition, they endanger everyone around them. A recent study found that in countries where immunization coverage was reduced, pertussis cases were 10 to 100 times more than those in highly vaccinated countries.

Before vaccinations, thousands of children died each year from a variety of illnesses, including measles, diphtheria, whooping cough and Hepatitis B. In fact, in 1921 alone, there were 206,000 reported cases of diphtheria in the United States and 15,520 deaths. Thanks to vaccinations, by the turn of the century (the year 2000) there was only ONE reported case of diphtheria. 

Unfortunately, these dangerous and deadly illnesses are on the rise, thanks in large part to misinformation regarding vaccinations. Television celebrities (who are not medically trained) and Internet sites continue to spread dangerous and false information for the purpose of increasing their ratings. This, unfortunately, puts everyone at risk—especially the children.